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#VoteThroat

We would like to thank everyone who voted for Deep Throat for inclusion in the Library of Congress National Film Registry!

We will post the results here as soon as they are announced.

 


 

THE NATIONAL FILM REGISTRY

Each year the Library of Congress selects 25 films for preservation based solely on
suggestions from the public. To be eligible a film must be 10+ years old and “culturally,
 historically, or aesthetically significant.”

According to their website:

“...We strongly encourage the nomination of the full-range of American film-making.”

Despite this claim, in its 34-year history an X-rated film has NEVER been selected.
The cultural impact of Deep Throat on American history is indisputable. On the 50th
 anniversary of its release, we urge you to VOTE THROAT by August 15, 2022!

All U.S. citizens are eligible to vote. Simply click on this link to the Nomination Form
 and type in “Deep Throat” (You may vote for up to 49 other films as well and it’s free!)


Deep Throat premiered at the World Theater in Times Square on June 12, 1972, and played off and on in that area for more than 20 years. The public was enthralled by the film, depositing $1 million in the theater's coffers in just the first seven weeks after it opened, and another $2 million by the end of six months. Since then, between theatrical and videotape/DVD sales, the film has earned at least $100 million, according to the FBI, though other knowledgeable sources put the figure as high as $600 million ($3.6 billion in 2019 dollars).

Famous people who acknowledge having seen the film include Martin Scorsese, Jack Nicholson, Johnny Carson, Truman Capote, Barbara Walters, Doris Day, Warren Beatty, Richard Dreyfuss, Spiro Agnew, Nora Ephron, Roger Ebert, Pauline Kael, John Waters, Hugh Hefner, Gore Vidal, Dr. Ruth Westheimer, Erica Jong, Dick Cavett, Helen Gurley Brown, Norman Mailer, Bill Maher, Sammy Davis Jr. and Frank Sinatra. Producer Brian Grazer's grandmother urged him to see it. Former Gov. and presidential candidate John Hickenlooper took his mom.

—and let’s not forget that the title was chosen as the name for the undercover FBI informant who broke the Watergate scandal giving term “Deep Throat” a new definition.

With all that history and recognition behind it, doesn’t Deep Throat deserve to be the first sexually explicit film to be inducted into the National Film Registry?